Dec 14, 2009

My New Chest Is Freezing!

It was Christmas, for all intents and purposes, this weekend at the Arggh! outpost in Charleston, SC. Family drove up from points south to warm our new digs and hang out with us at our family's two-home settlement in the fevered swamps of Gullah country.

It was my first effort at real cooking in about a year, since I lacked my own kitchen for the better part of this past year and had been working a demonic schedule with the Very Large Libations Emporium that will remain unnamed (even though I had to leave that job for physical reasons, i.e., tendonitis from lifting 12-packs up from the cart, out and over a scanner and back into the cart for 10 to 12 hours a day). The challenge of using a different stove and an oven with only one rack was met, more or less, with success if the silence of stuffed mouths is any indication.

So, we exchanged our favorite sort of gifts, Christmas Spirits, which everyone agrees is much more fun than drawing names or worrying about what to get everyone. The fun is in finding something exotic that doesn't taste like Paula Deen personally distilled it in her own over-sweetened kidneys, or doesn't smell like a wet dog next to a campfire.

But the nicest thing was a little extra gift from our visiting relatives, a cute little freezer chest that will be big enough for both small households to share. And considering that son Paul still finds time to creatively cook on weekends after putting in about 64 hours a week as a chef, we shall find good use for leftovers and pig heads and animal carcasses. It sits humming away in the little laundry room, freezing the first few leftover items from our feasting. Turkey a la king can't be a bad thing on one of very many dreary days of rain, fog, mist, rain, fog, mist, rinse and repeat.

I miss the warm sunshine of Florida more than you can imagine. I'm a Florida girl, river rat, a beach bum. The weather here is dismal with an average of only 65 clear days every year. My darling DIL suggests we begin a cranberry bog in the waterlogged back yard.

I'm considering that it's not a bad idea.

At least we can freeze the harvested berries.

7 comments:

Suzette said...

Everyone wants to act like their from New Jersey, even if it's trying to capture our "Garden State" nickname.

Velociman said...

For Christmas you should head south with the JR. Just towards Savannah. About halfway there on Highway 17, near Yemassee, you'll find the Oyotunji African village. "As seen on TV!" Founded by a used car salesman in 1970. It's like a little slice of heaven.
Well, I liked it.

Jean said...

Cranberries could probably be brewed or wined or likkered, I'm thinking.
Might be an interesting investment after all.

d:-)

PeggyU said...

If you like asparagus, I hear it grows well in damp ground too.

Joan of Argghh! said...

No, I think it's more conducive to growing coral. . .

ZZMike said...

Well, y'all know, if this global warming think keeps up, we're all gonna freeze to death.

I'm curious about those "exotic spirits". Like, f'r'instance, what?

"... leftovers and pig heads and animal carcasses ..."

You really ought to look into Julia Child's cookery-books.

My own experience with cooking extends not a whit past the Big Knob on the microwave, but here's a neat little site on what to do with one of those "tete a porcine":

"Head to Toe" -- Part Two (Pig's Head)

(Part One is "feet")

Looks like a lot of steps, but really, it should be a snap.

Anonymous said...

The fun is in finding something exotic that doesn't taste like Paula Deen personally distilled it in her own over-sweetened kidneys, or doesn't smell like a wet dog next to a campfire.

Too funny! Please send someone to pick me up off my (sunny Southern California) floor!

Lulu